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Mimouna

Looking for a good chametz filled, post-Passover party to go to? Look no further. Mimouna is exactly that.

moflettot, a Morrocan-Jewish thin crepe, covered with butter and nuts, and drenched in honey and syrup
Photo credit: Becca F

Mimouna, a holiday originating in the Maghrebi Jewish heritage of the North African region all the way back to the Middle Ages, is a celebration of food, friends, and family, and takes places the night after Passover! In Israel, it has become a cultural and widely celebrated holiday, and the perfect way to continue the party as we end a 7 day holiday!


How is the Mimouna celebrated in Israel exactly?

This is a day of dressing up in unique clothing, and opening up your home to your friends and strangers, inviting everyone to your table full of goods and sweets.


No, we are not mistaken. We're not talking about Halloween or Purim, Mimouna is an actual holiday, celebrated in many households throughout Israel. Although the holiday's origin isn't clear, its festive celebrations can be dated back to the 18th century.

The Mimouna has been celebrated in Israel since around 1965, and it has been gaining increasing popularity as the years go by.

In recent years, certain Mimouna celebrations have turned into political pilgrimages, where prime ministers, presidents, and even army generals show up and dine with the hosts.

The Mimouna holiday has a few traditions:

  • Eating sweets, especially homemade jams and cookies

  • Leaving the door open for anyone who wants to join- everyone is welcome to the festivities!

  • The house owner dips lettuce in milk and taps on people's heads, a blessing for health and wealth. (What? Is that weird to you? Haven't you ever tapped someone on the head with lettuce dipped in milk? You don't know what you're missing!)

  • Greeting people with the blessing "Tirvehu Vetis'adu", which is basically a blessing hoping you gain wealth so you will be able to help out those in need.

  • AND MOST IMPORTANTLY - Eating moflettot, a Morrocan-Jewish thin crepe, covered with butter and nuts, and drenched in honey and syrup. We know, it's not the healthiest superfood, but come on, you only get to eat this once a year, so don't worry, we won't tell anyone!

So put your party clothes back on, leave lots of room in your matzah filled stomachs, and get ready for a real treat!